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Buying and Storing Ginger   Buying Ginger: Ginger is a great root vegetable to make our dishes flavorful and delicious! Ginger is readily available and very easy to store for long term. We should always buy fresh ginger and avoid easy peeled or easy cut ginger. They lack the true flavor of ginger and wind up being pretty expensive. When buying ginger we want to buy the freshest ginger available  We want a firm, plump and unwrinkled root. This will provide the best flavor and also...
Buying and Storing Avocados...   Buying Avocados: Avocados can be a very delicate fruit and usually don’t last long. For this reason we want to make sure we buy the correct avocado based on our needs. If we need our avocados immediately then we want to pick one that is just slightly soft. Avocados should yield to a light squeeze and that’s how we can tell if they are ripe and ready to eat. For all other uses we should buy firm avocados. We can...
Buying and Storing Kiwis Buying Kiwis: A kiwi is a nice treat to have around the house, however it is a seasonal fruit so when we buy it we don’t want to waste it! Proper storage will help you keep your kiwis fresh and make them last longer. When at the store we should buy kiwis based on when we want to enjoy them. A ripe kiwi will give on a slight touch and feel just a bit soft. These are good to...

Buying and Storing Grapefruit

  Buying Grapefruit: Grapefruit can usually be bought year round, however its at its best from January to April. When purchasing a grapefruit we want to look for one that is heavy yet has smooth skin. This will ensure a juicy and delicious grapefruit.     Storing Grapefruit: If you plan on having your grapefruit in 5-7 days its perfectly safe to leave out on the counter. If you want to save your grapefruit for longer you can place it in the refrigerator for at least 2-3 weeks. Cut or partial used grapefruit should be stored in the fridge in a tight plastic container. This will allow your grapefruit to stay fresh and juicy. Tip: If you decided to store your grapefruit in the refrigerator, make sure you bring it back to room temperature before consuming. This will lead to a perfect juicy snack....

Buying and Storing Onions

  Buying Onions: Onions come in many different shapes, colors and sizes. For all types of onions it is important that you avoid onions that have cuts & bruises, sprouting and any type of mold. Also check the neck of the onion, this should be firm and not soft. All of these signs point to an onion that is starting to decay. Ideally you onions should have a dry brown crackly shell on the outside. There are generally 3 different types of onions, each have the own unique flavor: Red Onions: Probably the most mild onion of them all. Usually red onions aren’t cooked and are served raw in salads and on sandwiches Yellow Onions: Perhaps the most popular onion. Adds great flavor to stews, soups, and meat dishes. White Onions: A more mild flavor compared to yellow onions. If you don’t want a strong onion flavor use white onions for your dishes.   Storing Onions: Properly bought onions can last up to 6-8 months when stored correctly. We want to store our onions in a cool dark place and out of sunlight. They should not be put in the fridge as this will result in spoilage. Onions should always be stored separately and away from other produce. This is to avoid unnecessary spoilage and keep the other produce from absorbing the onions flavor. Cut or partial used onions should be stored in the fridge in a tight plastic container. This will allow you onion to stay fresh till your next recipe. Tip: If you don’t care about decor, use new pantyhose and tie a knot in between each onion.   What Not To Do: Do Not Store Near Potatoes: The potatoes will absorb the water from your onions causing both of your vegetables to spoil. Never Store In Plastic Bags: This prevents air flow and will cause your onions to spoil much much faster. Eat Slimy or Discolored Onions: These have likely gone bad and are not good to eat. Its best to toss them in the composte bin....

Buying and Storing Garlic

  Buying Garlic: Garlic is one of the main ingredients to many world wide cuisines. It is packed with health benefits and delicious flavor. When buying garlic, avoid the very large elephant garlic. Though we may think bigger, elephant garlic does not taste the same and is not to be used as a substitute for everyday garlic. We want to buy garlic that is firm and has plenty of dry papery shells. Any garlic head that shows signs of sprouting means they are old and not dried or stored correctly. Very old garlic will break apart easily with pressure.   Storing Garlic: Freshly bought garlic can last quite a long time if stored properly. We want to store our garlic in a cool dark place and out of sunlight. They should not be put in the fridge as this will result in spoilage. Garlic will age and spoil faster in direct sunlight. They will begin sprouting and eventually become soft and moldy. Always avoid direct sunlight when storing your garlic. The best place to store garlic is in a container that protects the bulbs from sunlight but has small holes to allow air circulation. Once the bulb is broken the cloves will last about 3-10 days. Tip: Plan ahead when cooking garlic. Its best to cut, crush or chop your garlic 10-15 mins prior to cooking in order for the alliicin to form.   What Not To Do: Never Store Garlic In Oil: This could result in Botulism, a very nasty toxin. It is best to buy your garlic oil from the store where it has been properly made. If Sprouting: The garlic is still safe to eat but its best you chop out the green as it will make your dish bitter. Properly stored garlic should never sprout though. Never Store In The Fridge: The cold temperature will ruin the taste as well as the texture of the garlic cloves....

Buying and Storing Bananas

  Buying Bananas: Bananas are one of the few fruits that can be bought all year round. They are harvested in exotic climates and shipped all over the world for our enjoyment. While at the super market you usually will want to pick a group of bananas that have a green or light green tint to them. They should be firm and have no visible bruises on them. They aren’t ripe yet but will be in a few days and ready for consumption.   Storing Bananas: The freshly bought light green bananas should be stored in room temperature. Bananas release a high concentration of ethylene gas so they should be stored separately from all other fruits and vegetables. If they are stored near other fruits and vegetable this will cause all your fresh food to spoil faster. Bananas should also be hung up to avoid bruising during the natural ripening process.  This allows you to keep your bananas for the maximum amount of time and avoid tossing brown bananas. A banana is ripe and ready to eat once they are a sunny yellow color and are at their best when they are solid yellow and have small brown spots.  Tip:  If you have any left over ripe bananas cut them up and store them in a Ziplock bag in the freezer. They will last about a month and go great in smoothies!   What Not To Do: Never Store Near Other Fruits or Vegetables: Because of the ethylene gas they release they will spoil your other fresh produce. Never Store In a Plastic or Paper Bag: The ethylene gas will be contained causing the bananas to ripen much faster.  You could do this if your bananas are to green and need them sooner rather than later. Never Store In The Fridge: Bananas aren’t used to the cold climates. Storing in the fridge will cause the natural ripening process to stop and the bananas skin will turn black while the insides won’t change much....